In The Media

UBC Civil In The Media – Are there toxic chemicals in B.C.’s drinking water?

Professor Rachel Scholes has applied to do research on how much of the toxic substances lurk in B.C.’s drinking water.

Turning skyscrapers into trees

Assistant Professor Jongho Lee takes a leaf from nature’s book with new technology that turns buildings into giant trees.

UBC Civil In The Media – Des données du monde entier permettent d’estimer les risques sismiques en C.-B. (French)

Originally published in: CBC Radio Canada Pendant que la Colombie-Britannique poursuit son programme d’atténuation sismique et continue à rénover ses écoles, des experts expliquent que ces décisions politiques ont été prises sur la base de données issues du monde entier, faute de tremblement de terre majeur survenu dans la province. Les prévisions séismologiques se fondent notamment sur […]

UBC Civil In The Media – Séismes: près de 300 écoles de la Colombie-Britannique toujours à risque (French)

Originally published in: CBC Radio Canada Le programme d’atténuation sismique de la Colombie-Britannique, destiné à mettre 496 écoles de la province aux normes sismiques, arrive à mi-chemin. En date de mai 2022, 202 écoles ont été rénovées ou reconstruites, 25 sont en construction, cinq sont à construire, 14 sont en cours d’analyse de rentabilisation et 250 sont classées parmi les « priorités […]

UBC Civil In The Media – Sensor network can protect roads, bridges from damage caused by flooding

Originally published in: Journal of Commerce Nemy Banthia, a professor of civil engineering at the University of British Columbia (UBC), and his doctoral student Mohammed Farooq have developed a sensor network that can detect the early stages of mudslides and bridge foundation failures that are caused by flooding. What happens when rushing water assaults a […]

UBC Civil In The Media – Artist paints Vancouver Chinatown’s historic buildings to shed light on once ‘thriving’ neighbourhood

Donna Seto was featured on CBC for her paintings of Vancouver Chinatown’s historic buildings.

UBC Civil In The Media – Sewage plant samples show Omicron infections dropping in Lower Mainland

Assistant Professor Ryan Ziels talks about his research on detecting COVID in wastewater.

UBC Civil In The Media – Sensor warning system could predict B.C. mudslides, bridge collapse

Originally published in: North Shore News 5G Internet technology is powering a new generation of smart technologies collectively known as the ‘Internet of Things.’ After the worst flooding in B.C.’s modern history, could the new tech also save our homes and bridges? The next generation of wireless internet technology has led to some big promises — […]

UBC Civil In The Media – B.C. Flooding and Landslides

UBC Civil faculty spoke to media to offer their analysis and expertise on the challenges ahead with infrastructure rebuilding.

BC Natural Disaster Technical Briefing – Webcast Recording

Watch a recording of the webcast featuring our faculty members sharing their observations on the impact of the recent BC natural disasters.

Discussing water treatment system

Tuesday, April 25, 2017 | By Lindsay Cashin Radio Canada interviewed Pierre Bérubé, a UBC civil engineering professor and project lead on an invention that uses bacteria and gravity to turn non-potable water into drinking water. Prof. Bérubé said membranes in the system latch on to particles like dirt, bacteria and viruses.

How clean water in remote communities could be cheap and easy

Wednesday, April 5, 2017 | By Lindsay Cashin CTV reported on UBC Civil Engineering researchers who have created a system that uses bacteria and gravity to turn grey water into drinking water. Professor Pierre Bérubé, who led the project, said the technology removes the need for chemicals and complex mechanical systems that make water treatment systems […]

“Does Vancouver Need to Save Water?” Adjunct Prof. Troy Vassos talks with CKNW on the benefits of reclaiming wastewater

Thursday, March 30, 2017 | By Lindsay Cashin Adjunct professor Troy Vassos spoke with the Jon McComb Show on World Water Day about the benefits of recycling wastewater for non-potable use in buildings and facilities around the world. Listen to the segment here: https://omny.fm/shows/the-jon-mccomb-show/does-vancouver-need-to-save-wa…

Profs. Bérubé, Banthia’s IC-IMPACTS work featured in “Troubled Waters” series

Friday, March 24, 2017 | By Lindsay Cashin The work being done by Professors Pierre Bérubé, Nemy Banthia, and other researchers with IC-IMPACTS is highlighted in “Troubled Waters,” a new five-part series in The Province. The series follows researchers to sites in India and Northern BC, where issues of drinking water contamination are gravely impacting local communities. […]

Civil in the news: Prof. Don Mavinic on modern wastewater treatment challenges

Tuesday, May 10, 2016 | By Lindsay Cashin Professor Don Mavinic is quoted in a recent opinion piece for the Times Colonist, by Jonathan Wilkinson, MP for North Vancouver and parliamentary secretary to the Minister of Environment and Climate Change. Mr. Wilkinson discusses the implementation of effective sewage treatment in the Capital Regional District in […]

Civil in the News: Prof. Loretta Li analyzes ancient medicinal clay

Wednesday, February 3, 2016 | By Lindsay Cashin Professor Loretta Li is mentioned in a recent UBC Media release about research being conducted on Kisameet clay, long used by the Heiltsuk First Nation for its healing potential. First Nation’s clay kills antibiotic-resistant bacteria in lab tests – CBC News When Tradition Meets Business and Science: The Complex […]

Civil in the news: Prof. Bernard Laval quoted in article about controversial LNG terminal

Wednesday, December 2, 2015 | By Lindsay Cashin UBC engineering professor Bernard Laval was quoted in a VICE News article that examined the controversy around a proposed LNG terminal for Lelu island.

Civil in the news: Dr. Bernard Laval provides expert commentary on the future of Quesnel Lake after the Mount Polley mine disaster

Wednesday, May 6, 2015 | By Lindsay Cashin Civil professor Bernard Laval provided local media with commentary on the condition of Quesnel Lake following the Mount Polley Mine disaster. Articles appeared in CTV News, the Vancouver Sun, and the Vancouver Observer.